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Pseudoephedrine

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Brian Vandenberg and KY3 News Producer | August 26, 2013
Springfield - Monday night Springfield City Council postponed a vote on a controversial ordinance to require a prescription to buy things that contain pseudoephedrine.  It's a common ingredient in cold medicine, and a key ingredient in making methamphetamine.  Council voted 5-4 to indefinitely postpone a vote on the proposal.
NEWS
by Emily Wood, KY3 News and ewood@ky3.com | April 2, 2013
SPRINGFIELD, Mo. --  Certain sinus relief could soon require a prescription in Springfield.  City officials are considering an ordinance that would require a prescription before you can buy any medicines containing pseudoephedrine, a product that is also a key ingredient in production of methamphetamine.  After about 30 minutes of discussion, council members decided in a committee meeting on Tuesday to recommend the ordinance to the full council....
NEWS
edited news release | May 30, 2013
SPRINGFIELD, Mo. -- City Councilman Craig Fishel will host a public meeting from 5:30 - 6:30 p.m. Friday at the Dan Kinney Family Center, 2701 S. Blackman Road.   Fishel received a large number of questions and comments from constituents in his zone about a bill being referred by the Council's Community Involvement Committee that would require a prescription for medicine containing pseudoephedrine. The committee unanimously recommended the City adopt the prescription requirement in an effort to curb methamphetamine labs, and related activities, in the city.
NEWS
by Linda Russell and KY3 Reporter | November 20, 2012
SPRINGFIELD, Mo.-- Meth labs in Springfield are spreading like a chemical plague, and city leaders are trying to find a way to slow them down. Some city leaders opt for what 70 other Missouri cities and counties have done to control it.  It's been nearly two years since a state-wide system to track pseudoephedrine sales went into effect.  Springfield Police say last year, the system helped locate only 4% of meth labs. "The meth cooks and the addicts have found a way around that, and the only way the tracking system is used now is after the fact," says Springfield Police Chief Paul Williams.
NEWS
by Mike Landis, KY3 News and mlandis@ky3.com | August 10, 2012
NIXA, Mo. - Despite safe streets and a low crime rate, Police Chief James Bacon is quick to admit, “ We do have a meth problem in our community.”  That's exactly why he was pushing for a city ordinance requiring a doctor's prescription to buy cold medicines containing pseudoephedrine- a key ingredient used to make meth. “It is not going to eliminate it.  But it is going to make it that much harder for those that are making meth to get the thing they need in order to make it,” stated Bacon.
NEWS
by Paula Morehouse and Justin Haase, KY3 News | June 3, 2013
SPRINGFIELD -- City Council on Monday night discussed a proposed ordinance that would make it more difficult to get access to one of the key ingredients of methamphetamine. The measure would make Pseudoephedrine available by prescription only. It would apply to all forms of the allergy and cold medicine containing Pseudoephedrine to include tablets, gels and liquids.  A handful of people spoke out at the meeting on this topic.      Some said the bill would be a financial burden on citizens.
NEWS
by Mike Landis, KY3 News and mlandis@ky3.com | May 31, 2013
SPRINGFIELD, Mo. - A proposed city ordinance could make it harder to buy certain cold medicines.  Supporters say it would help curb the meth epidemic.  However, opponents say it strips citizens of their person liberties. Springfield Police Chief Paul Williams is a main proponent of the ordinance, which is similar those past in several other communities across the state in recent years. "To impact the  meth problem we have one recourse left to us, Williams stated.  "It's been proven successful in other places.
NEWS
by Ashley Reynolds, KY3 News and areynolds@ky3.com | September 9, 2012
SPRINGFIELD, Mo. -- A city councilman is looking into requiring people to have a prescription before buying medications with pseudoephedrine, a key ingredient used to make meth. Councilman Jeff Seifried is not saying he supports having a prescription to buy these drugs. He wants to start a discussion. "I've seen the effects it has on people in my zone and in Springfield. It's real. It's not out of sight, out of mind for me," he said. Jeff Seifried oversees Zone 1. That's the northwest side of Springfield.
NEWS
Ashley Reynolds, KY3 News and areynolds@ky3.com | August 26, 2013
NIXA, Mo --    Springfield city council is scheduled to vote Monday on a controversial measure to require a prescription to buy cold medicines that contain pseudoephedrine, which is the key ingredient in making meth. It's a growing community with a growing problem. Nixa Police say more people who live outside the city limits are coming to Nixa to buy medicines with pseudoephedrine. Almost half of the purchases are bought by someone who does not live in Nixa. They say this has caused an uptick in meth cases.
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NEWS
Ashley Reynolds, KY3 News and areynolds@ky3.com | August 26, 2013
NIXA, Mo --    Springfield city council is scheduled to vote Monday on a controversial measure to require a prescription to buy cold medicines that contain pseudoephedrine, which is the key ingredient in making meth. It's a growing community with a growing problem. Nixa Police say more people who live outside the city limits are coming to Nixa to buy medicines with pseudoephedrine. Almost half of the purchases are bought by someone who does not live in Nixa. They say this has caused an uptick in meth cases.
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NEWS
Brian Vandenberg and KY3 News Producer | August 26, 2013
Springfield - Monday night Springfield City Council postponed a vote on a controversial ordinance to require a prescription to buy things that contain pseudoephedrine.  It's a common ingredient in cold medicine, and a key ingredient in making methamphetamine.  Council voted 5-4 to indefinitely postpone a vote on the proposal.
NEWS
Posted by Kristy Larangeira and news@ky3.com | August 13, 2013
SPRINGFIELD, Mo. -- The Springfield City Council continues to weigh the needs of consumers against the dangers of meth.  Members met at lunch on Tuesday to again consider a proposed ordinance to require prescriptions for cold meds containing pseudoephdrine, the key ingredient for methamphetamine production. Other places in the Ozarks have voted for the prescription requirement, including Hollister, Branson, and Ozark.  The Springfield council has been studying the issue for months and public opinion polls appear to be against the idea.  Councilman Doug Burlison wants to put the proposed ordinance to a public vote if the city council approves it. Police say it's the best way to keep a key ingredient out of the hands of meth makers.  Those in opposition say the impact is too extreme for law abiding citizens because they would have to make and pay for visits to a doctor to get a prescription.  They also argue meth makers from Mexico would fill the demand left by the inability to make meth locally.
NEWS
by Linda Russell, KY3 News and lrussell@ky3.com | June 26, 2013
SPRINGFIELD, Mo. -- The Springfield City Council is preparing to vote on an ordinance that would make a popular cold and allergy medicine available by prescription only.  One council member says he has a better idea: let the people decide. Springfield city council has been discussing the pseudoephedrine issue for months.  If it became law, you would need a prescription to get pseudoephedrine products at a pharmacy in Springfield.  The council is scheduled to vote soon, but Councilman Doug Burlison wants the voters to have the final say. Cities like Branson, Hollister and Ozark have taken it off the shelves, leaving it to doctors to prescribe.  Springfield is still considering how pseudoephedrine should be sold.
NEWS
by Paula Morehouse and Justin Haase, KY3 News | June 3, 2013
SPRINGFIELD -- City Council on Monday night discussed a proposed ordinance that would make it more difficult to get access to one of the key ingredients of methamphetamine. The measure would make Pseudoephedrine available by prescription only. It would apply to all forms of the allergy and cold medicine containing Pseudoephedrine to include tablets, gels and liquids.  A handful of people spoke out at the meeting on this topic.      Some said the bill would be a financial burden on citizens.
NEWS
by Mike Landis, KY3 News and mlandis@ky3.com | May 31, 2013
SPRINGFIELD, Mo. - A proposed city ordinance could make it harder to buy certain cold medicines.  Supporters say it would help curb the meth epidemic.  However, opponents say it strips citizens of their person liberties. Springfield Police Chief Paul Williams is a main proponent of the ordinance, which is similar those past in several other communities across the state in recent years. "To impact the  meth problem we have one recourse left to us, Williams stated.  "It's been proven successful in other places.
NEWS
edited news release | May 30, 2013
SPRINGFIELD, Mo. -- City Councilman Craig Fishel will host a public meeting from 5:30 - 6:30 p.m. Friday at the Dan Kinney Family Center, 2701 S. Blackman Road.   Fishel received a large number of questions and comments from constituents in his zone about a bill being referred by the Council's Community Involvement Committee that would require a prescription for medicine containing pseudoephedrine. The committee unanimously recommended the City adopt the prescription requirement in an effort to curb methamphetamine labs, and related activities, in the city.
NEWS
by Jay Scherder, KY3 News and jscherder@ky3.com | March 20, 2013
BRANSON WEST, Mo -- Another Ozarks community could soon go pseudoephedrine free, at least over the counter, if the Branson West police chief gets his way.   To help combat meth production,  he is introducing an ordinance to require prescriptions for most cold medicines containing pseudoephedrine. Chief Steve Dalton says, because other communities have passed similar measures, criminals are now coming to his city to buy the drugs. The ordinance would allow some cold medicines over the counter -- like Zephrex-D.  It is a tamper-resistant type of cold medicine.
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